Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.

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Sloka Series

In our day to day lives, we express our bhakti (devotion) by reciting slokas in praise of Bhagavan.  Slokas explain to us the philosophy of dharma.  We believe that the power of reciting any sloka is enhanced when one understands the meaning of the verse in the correct context.  In this series, we bring you well researched meaning of the verses to start your journey towards the goal of understanding the slokas.

About the App

  • High quality, inexpensive, paid app, with no click-bait.
  • Language agnostic.  Many of us are conversant in multiple languages with different comfort levels.  In this app, you can read and listen to slokas and explanations in multiple languages.  This is independent of your locale setting.
  • Slokas transliterated in multiple languages.
  • Audio synced to text for easy following.
  • Well researched, clear meaning and explanation of the slokas from the primary source.
  • The app was specifically designed to help parents teach their children to recite and understand the slokas and also to be a part of your personal reference library, to help you in your spiritual quest.
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Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.

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Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.

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Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.

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Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.

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Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.
Pongal Pongal, also called Makara Shankranthi, is the four day long festival that is celebrated around the 15th of January in the Gregorian calender. Pongal is a celebration of the bounties of harvest. On the first day of Pongal, called Bogi (போகி), everything old, worn and dirty is cleaned up or thrown away. The entire house is tidied top to bottom and gaily decorated in preparation for the festivities to come. Bogi is on the last day of the month of Margazhi (மார்கழி). The next day is the festival of Pongal (பொங்கல்), on the first day of the month of Thai (தை). The house is decorated with mango leaves and intricate kolam (rangoli). This day is meant for the worship of Surya, the sun god. After all, everything, from the biggest to the smallest, depends on the sun for life, growth and sustenance. In villages, the spot touched by the first rays of dawn is decorated for the puja. The kolam for the puja represents the chariot or ratha of Surya. Surya sits resplendent in his chariot while his charioteer, Aruna, guides it across the sky. It has a single wheel with 24 spokes, representing the 24 hours in a day, and is pulled by seven horses, for the seven days of the week. A new pot decorated with fresh turmeric leaves, sandalwood paste and kumkum, is filled with fresh milk and set to boil. As the milk boils, children shout “pongolo pongal”. Pongal in Tamil means both ‘to boil’ and ‘abundance’, so with those joyous cries are a prayer for abundance in harvest, wealth and prosperity. Afterwards, freshly harvested rice and jaggery are added to the milk to make chakkarai pongal and is then offered to Surya. The third day of Pongal is called Maatu Pongal (மாட்டுப்பொங்கல்) and is the day where cows, which form an integral part of agrarian life, are celebrated. They are decorated with bells and colorful ornaments and puja is performed to them. The ancient tradition of jallikattu is also played on this day. Some families also celebrate Kanu Pongal (கனுப் பொங்கல்) on this day, where women offer rice and other foods to the birds and offer prayers for the health and prosperity of their brothers. Brothers, in turn, give gifts to their sisters. The last day of Pongal is Kaanum Pongal (காணும் பொங்கல்) where families and friends get together and visit temples, beaches and other such places to spend a day enjoying each other’s company. Plenty of food is brought along and the outings often turn into picnics.